ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPE BOOKS by Bridget White

ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPE BOOKS by Bridget White
ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPE BOOKS by Bridget White

No Copy and Paste from this Site

All the recipes and Photographs on this Site are old Family Recipes and tried and tested by the Author. Please feel free to try out these old recipes, and relish them, but desist from copying and using on other sites without the prior permission of Bridget White-Kumar. Any infringement would amount to Plagarism and infringement of Copy Rightpunishable by Law

Sunday, December 2, 2012

ANGLO-INDIAN CUISINE - A LEGACY OF FLAVOURS FROM THE PAST - GOURMAND WORLD COOK BOOKS AWARDS 2012


Today I received an email from GOURMAND INTERNATIONAL informing me that I was selected as the ‘WINNER FROM INDIA’ at the GOURMAND WORLD COOK BOOKS AWARDS 2012 . under the Category ‘BEST CULINARY HISTORY BOOK’ for my recipe book ANGLO-INDIAN CUISINE - A LEGACY OF FLAVOURS FROM THE PAST and that I now qualify for the next GOURMAND BEST IN THE WORLD COMPETITION at the Awards Night to be held in Paris on 23rd Feb 2013. They have also  invited me to be a part of this Awards Night. 
This prestigious Award is ‘THE OSCARS’  for Cook book writers. Awards are given every year for various categories and genres ie for Cook Book Authors, Cook Books, Chefs, Wine makers, etc.
I submitted my recipe Book ANGLO-INDIAN CUISINE - A LEGACY OF FLAVOURS FROM THE PAST to the GOUMAND INTERNATIONAL based in Spain as an entry for the GOURMAND WORLD COOK BOOKS AWARDS 2012 about a month ago barely making it before the closing date.  In the preliminary round one must be selected from out of the entries submitted by each country. The winner will then qualify to compete for the World Award ‘FOR BEST IN THE WORLD’at the awards night to be held in Paris on 23rd Feb 2013.
I now qualify for the finals for the ‘FOR BEST IN THE WORLD’  AWARD  under the category BEST CULINARY HISTORY BOOK
Here is the email I received from them


They will be sending me my certificate shortly for having won ‘WINNER IN INDIA’
This is the link to the GOURMAND website www.cookbookfair.com 

Sunday, November 25, 2012

CHRISTMAS PUDDING ON STIR UP SUNDAY

CHRISTMAS PUDDING ON STIR UP SUNDAY
Today the 25th November 2012  is STIR UP SUNDAY. Stir Up Sunday is also known as Christmas Pudding Sunday. Stir Up Sunday falls on the last Sunday before Advent. Advent begins 4 Sundays before Christmas.
Christmas Puddings were traditionally always made on Stir-up Sunday which is the last Sunday before Advent begins.
The Christmas Pudding is traditionally made with 13 ingredients representing Jesus Christ and his 12 Disciples. The Christmas pudding is stirred from East to West in honour of the 3 wise men who came from the east to visit the Savoiur child
Every member of the family gives the pudding a stir and makes a wish. A coin, a ring or a thimble are sometime added to the pudding mixture. The coin and thimble  supposedledly brings luck and wealth to the person who gets it in his / her piece of the pudding on Christmas day, and the finger ring would foretell a wedding to the person who gets it.
So get your ingredients ready and everyone join in to stir up the Christmas Pudding .
An easy recipe is given below

SPECIAL CHRISTMAS PLUM PUDDING
Serves 6 Preparation time 1 hour
Ingredients
200 grams fresh bread crumbs                     
200 grams butter
2 teaspoons instant coffee (Nescafe or Bru) 
2 teaspoons golden or date syrup
½ teaspoon baking powder                            
2 eggs beaten well
¼ cup rum                                                       
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, cloves and  nutmeg                           
100 grams raisins
100 grams chopped sultanas                         
100 grams mixed peel
½ teaspoon salt                                              
100 grams sugar
Cream the butter and sugar together then add the eggs and mix well.
Gradually add all the other ingredients and mix well.
Grease a Pudding Mould or any suitable bowl with butter and pour the pudding mixture into it.
 Steam the pudding for about 1 hour on low heat till it is firm to touch
Note:  This pudding can be made in advance and refrigerated till required. Steam for 10 minute or microwave for 3 minutes before serving.
For a more exotic taste, when still warm make a few small holes all over the pudding and pour about 6 tablespoons of rum over it.
 This recipe is from my recipe Book THE ANGLO-INDIAN FESTIVE HAMPER


Thursday, November 15, 2012

THE GRINDING STONE – AN INDESPENSIBLE PART OF LIFE IN THE OLDEN DAYS

THE GRINDING STONE – AN INDESPENSIBLE PART OF LIFE IN THE OLDEN DAYS

In the olden days, cooking would take up practically the whole day since everything had to be prepared from scratch. The masalas had to be ground manually on a grinding stone and the food cooked over firewood.

The grinding stone was an indispensable appendage in every home in the olden days. It was used on a regular basis to grind the masalas or curry stuff required for the daily cooking, The grinding stone consisted of a flat granite stone about two feet in length and one foot breadth. The wet or dry ingredients were placed on this stone and another stone about 10 inches in length that was shaped like a roller or cylinder was used to grind the masalas in an up and down direction. This grinding stone was known as “Ammi Kal” in Tamil.




The top of the grinding stone had to be rough and coarse so that the masalas could be ground easily to a smooth texture. However, due to continuous grinding, the grinding stone would become smooth, and it would take longer to grind the ingredients to the required consistency. This was when the ‘Grinding Stone Tapper’ was called in to tap the grinding stone to make it rough again.

The grinding stone tapper would use a small chisel and hammer to first make small pits in a star design in the centre of the grinding stone and then continue tapping the stone with his chisel and hammer around this design till the whole surface of the grinding stone was covered with small pits very close together. He repeated the same procedure with the top stone as well. The Grinding Stone Man had his own peculiar way of calling out ‘Ammi Kalu. Ammi Kalu’  to let people know that he was coming around. 

Some houses had yet another type of grinding stone which was used to grind wet masalas and  batter for Idlis and Dosas, or rice pancakes. This grinding stone was shaped like a small barrel with a hole in the centre. The dry masalas or the soaked rice and dhal with a little water, was put into this hole and was ground to a smooth batter with another cylindrical shaped stone in a rotary movement. When these grinding stones became smooth, the Ammi Kallu man would tap this stone as well to make it coarse again.




This type of grinding stone was known as ‘Rubbu Kal’ in Tamil which meant ‘to rotate’.
Using this type of grinding stone was actually a sort of exercise and it ensured a daily work out for the grinder as the hands and upper body of the person doing the grinding was fully exercised!

This old concept of the ‘Rubbu Kal’ is used in the modern day electric grinders.

Every house also had its own pestle and mortar of undressed granite which was used for pounding small quantities of dry spices. The action of pounding the spices and making them into a smooth powder was quite therapeutic and exciting at the same time.

Man has come a long way from the Stone Age. But its so amazing to think that we have come to adapt and innovate the most primitive of man’s tools for survival and use them to make our lives easier today amongst modern inventions and technology.  

Now with all the ready-made masalas and mixes available in the market and the modern and time saving gadgets, cooking has become so much easier and faster. The old grinding stones have now been replaced by Mixers / Blenders and Grinders

Monday, October 29, 2012

ANGLO-INDIAN LAMB / MUTTON BIRYANI



ANGLO-INDIAN LAMB / MUTTON BIRYANI
Serves 6    Preparation time 1 hour
Ingredients

1 kg Basmati Rice or any other long grained Rice …wash and soak for about 1 hour
1 kg Mutton / Lamb or Beef cut into fairly big pieces
3 bay leaves
2 teaspoons all spice powder or garam masala
3 large tomatoes chopped
3 small sticks of cinnamon, 3 cloves, 3 cardamoms
2 cups oil or ghee
Salt to taste
6 green chilies slit lengthwise
3 tablespoons ginger garlic paste
2 teaspoons chillie powder
3 large onions sliced finely           
1 teaspoon turmeric powder
½ cup fresh mint leaves
3 tablespoons curds / yogurt

Wash the meat and marinate with the spice powder, green chillies, curds, half the quantity of ginger garlic paste and turmeric powder for half an hour.

Heat the oil or ghee in a large vessel and add the bay leaves, cloves, cinnamon, cardamom, remaining ginger garlic paste and onions and sauté for some time. Add the chopped tomatoes, mint leaves and chillie powder and simmer till the oil separates from the mixture and the tomatoes are reduced to pulp. Add the marinated meat and salt and cook for 10 minutes. Remove the pieces and keep aside. Now add sufficient water to the gravy in the vessel so as to get about 7 glasses of liquid. Add the rice and cook till half done. Now add the cooked meat and mix well. Cover and cook on low heat for a few more minutes till all the liquid evaporates and the Biryani is done.
Serve with Curd Chutney or Pilaf (palau) Chutney

PALAU CHUTNEY OR CURD CHUTNEY
Ingredients
2 tablespoons roughly ground coconut paste
2 green chilies
2   medium size onions chopped finely
1 tablespoon chopped coriander leaves
½ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon lime juice
½ teaspoon sugar
½ cup curds or yogurt

Mix all the ingredients together and serve as an accompaniment for Biryani or Palau.

Sunday, October 28, 2012

LAMB / MUTTON POT ROAST



LAMB / MUTTON POT ROAST

Serves 6   Preparation time 1 hour
Ingredients
A 2 kg chunk of lamb or mutton or 1 whole leg of lamb / mutton
3 large potatoes boiled and peeled
2 tablespoons vinegar
2 teaspoons pepper
2 tablespoons butter
2 inch pieces of cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
Salt to taste

Method:
Wash the lamb / mutton leg and make deep cuts on it. Rub it well all over with the salt, pepper, turmeric and vinegar.  Place it in a big oven proof dish or pressure cooker along with the butter and cinnamon and braise it by frying on high heat for some time till the meat turns a light brown. Add sufficient water and cook on medium heat till the meat is tender. Continue roasting turning from side to side, till the meat is nice and brown. Add the potatoes and roast well.  Serve hot or cold with bread and steamed vegetables.

The lamb / mutton / leg of lamb could also be roasted in an oven using the same recipe.

(NOTE: The turmeric helps in giving it a lovely shade of brown. Add 2 broken red chillies while roasting if more pungency is required )

Saturday, October 20, 2012

BONE PEPPER WATER

Bone Pepper Water is also known as Breast Bone Pepper water since mostly the soft peices of meat and bones from the breast portion is used in its preparation. Bone pepper water is actually a spicier version of Mulligatawny Soup.

Serves 6   preparation Time 45 minutes
Ingredients
½ kg soup bones and pieces of meat preferably from the breast portion
2 teaspoons cumin powder                    
1 teaspoons chillie powder                  
1 teaspoon pepper powder                   
2 teaspoons coriander powder              
½ teaspoon turmeric powder                
2 large onions chopped                        
2 large tomatoes chopped
Salt to taste                                            
1 teaspoon crushed garlic
½ cup tamarind juice                             
 ½ cup coconut paste or coconut milk (optional)
2 tablespoons chopped coriander leaves for garnishing

Cook all the above ingredients with about 4 cups of water in a pressure cooker first on high heat then on low for ½ an hour till the meat and bones are soft and the pepper water is quite thick. Season with mustard, curry leaves and chopped onion. Garnish with coriander leaves. Serve hot with plain rice and any chutney.

Monday, October 15, 2012

The 3 Most Important Ingredients used in Anglo-Indian Cooking – Vinegar, Ginger and Garlic Paste and Oil

The 3 Most Important Ingredients used in Anglo-Indian Cooking – Vinegar, Ginger and Garlic Paste and Oil

1. As far as possible use White Non-Fruit Vinegar in Vindaloo and other dishes calling for Vinegar. Fruit Vinegars such Apple cider Vinegar, coconut vinegar, etc would give our Anglo-Indian Vindaloo a completely different taste.

2. To get the authentic Anglo-Indian Curry taste while using the recipes in my books, use ginger and garlic paste that is ground at home in a blender using fresh root ginger and garlic. The ready made ginger and garlic paste available in stores around the world contain preservatives and other ingredients that detract from the original taste of the Curry giving it a completely different flavour.  

If fresh home made ginger and garlic paste is not available, then Garlic Powder can be used instead of fresh garlic. 1 teaspoon of garlic powder is equal to a whole garlic, so half a teaspoon would suffice. Ginger powder too can be substituted for fresh ginger. 1 teaspoon of dry ginger powder mixed with ¼ cup of water is equal to 2 teaspoons of fresh ginger paste, so half a teaspoon of ginger powder would be equal to 1 teaspoon of fresh ginger paste.

3. Any good cooking oil could be used in the preparation of these dishes such as Sun flower Oil, groundnut Oil or even Olive Oil depending on one’s preference.

All the Recipes in my Books are for 6 generous servings. If cooking for a smaller or larger number, the quantities should be adjusted accordingly. Likewise, the pungency of the dishes could be reduced by reducing the amount of chillie powder and other seasonings according to individual tastes.

Saturday, October 13, 2012

CHICKEN LIVER PEPPER FRY


CHICKEN LIVER PEPPER FRY
Serves 6    Preparation Time 45 minutes
Ingredients
½ kg chicken liver cut into pieces      
2 large onions sliced finely
2 or 3 teaspoons ground pepper                            
2 green chillies slit
Salt to taste                                                              
3 tablespoons oil
½ teaspoon turmeric powder

Wash the chicken livers well.  Boil them with a little water and salt till done. Heat oil in a pan and fry the onions till golden brown.  Add the cooked gizzards and liver together with the slit green chillies, turmeric powder, pepper powder and salt and keep frying on low heat till dry and brown

Saturday, September 22, 2012

ANGLO-INDIAN DINNER - THE TAJ WEST END

Mr. Vir Sanghvi, the noted Editor and Television Celebrity is in Bangalore in connection with the historic event of The Taj West End Bangalore celebrating 125 years of the West End this year.

He and Mrs. Sanghvi are presently guests of The Taj West End Bangalore. The Taj West End as part of the celebration is showing Colonial Anglo-Indian Food and Mr. and Mrs. Sanghvi were treated to a special Anglo-Indian Dinner on the 20th September 2012 at THE TAJ WEST END (MYNT RESTAURANT).

I was requested by Executive Chef Sandip Narang of the Taj West End to formulate a special Menu of popular and tasty Colonial Anglo-Indian Dishes and personally supervise the preparation of these dishes that were served to Mr. and Mrs. Sanghvi at Dinner last night.

Needless to say that both of them thoroughly enjoyed the delicious spread of Anglo-Indian Coconut Rice, Mince Ball Curry, Colonial Pepper Chicken, Railway meat curry, Bengal lancer’s Shrimp Curry, Prawn Fry, Liver and Onions, Pan fried Pepper Fish, Fish Kedgeree, Seer Fish in a Tangy Gravy, Pork devil Fry, Potato Chops, etc, together with a selection of Anglo-Indian pickles, relishes and chutneys. Dessert was a selection of old Anglo-Indian favourites such as Bread Pudding, open Pineapple tarts and miniature Apple Crumble together with Custard sauce. They were truly appreciative of the wonderful taste of Anglo-Indian Food and the rich culinary history behind each dish that I explained and talked about.
 
 
I also presented them with a few of my Anglo-Indian Recipe Books which was graciously received.

My sincere, grateful and special thanks to Executive Chef Sandip Narang and the Taj West End Bangalore for giving me this wonderful opportunity of sharing my expertise in Anglo-Indian Cuisine and being part of the team on this occasion. 

All credit for the wonderful Anglo-Indian Meal should be given to all the team at the MYNT Kitchen in particular Chefs Bharat Kapoor, Abhijit Mallick, Sukesh, Phillip, Parimal, Pranav, Susainathan, keshav Rao, Srinivas, Manoj, Niranjan, Manju, Santosh, Nanda, Melvin, Jose, Devandra, Ramachandra, Milton and all the other staff who supported me and helped to make this a success. Thank you and God bless you all.

Sunday, September 9, 2012

CHICKEN STEW

A typical Anglo-Indian recipe for Chicken Stew - A hearty and wholesome dish.


CHICKEN STEW
Serves 6 Preparation Time 1 hour
Ingredients
1 kg chicken cut into medium pieces
2 tablespoons oil
2 potatoes peeled and cut into quarters
2 carrots peeled and cut into medium size pieces
4 or 5 string beans cut into medium size pieces
1 teaspoon pepper corns
1 tomato chopped
½ teaspoon chopped ginger
½ teaspoon chopped garlic
Salt to taste
3 green chillies slit
2 onions sliced
A few mint leaves          
2 tablespoons flour

Cook the Chicken along with the potatoes, carrots, beans, peppercorns, green chilies, tomato, ginger, garlic, mint, salt, and sufficient water till tender. Make a thin paste of the flour with about ¼ cup of water. In another pan heat the oil and fry the onions till golden brown. Add the flour paste and fry along with the onions for some time. Add the cooked chicken and vegetables and simmer for 5 minutes. Serve hot with bread or Hoppers.

Thursday, August 30, 2012

CHICKEN AND VEGETABLE HOTCH POTCH

CHICKEN AND VEGETABLE HOTCH POTCH is a legacy from the Scots to Anglo-Indian Cuisine. It was very popular in the olden days and was invariably prepared at least once a week in Anglo-Indian Homes long ago. It was rather like a stew and was a meal in itself.

It was also known as the Harvest Broth in Scotland as all the fresh vegetables and freshly slaughtered meat at summer's end were packed into a light broth for a wonderfully fresh stew.

This dish is quite tasty and attractive, with white, bright orange, and green vegetable chunks, redolent with chicken,  fresh herbs and a few spices all cooked together to a 'hotch-potch consistency'



Ingredients
½ kg chicken with the bones
2 onions chopped finely
4 carrots, peeled and chopped
3 tablespoons chopped spring onions
1 cup chopped beans
1 cup fresh green peas
1 medium cauliflower cut into florets
2 teaspoons mint chopped
1 teaspoon sugar  
Salt and Pepper to taste
2 pieces cinnamon
4 cloves
1 teaspoon chopped garlic
2 bay leaves
Oil for frying
2 teaspoons chopped corriander or parsley (optional)

Heat oil in a suitable vessel and add the onions, cinnamon, cloves, Bay leaves and chopped garlic. Fry till the onions turn golden brown. Add the chicken together with all the other ingredients and mix well. Add sufficient water and cook till the chicken and vegetables are soft and the gravy is thick. Serve with crusty bread.

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

PRAWN TEMPERADO or TEMPERED PRAWNS

                                      PRAWN  TEMPERADO OR TEMPERED PRAWNS
The word ‘Temperado’ is a Portuguese word literally means to sauté or fry. This is a semi-dry curry and the gravy clings thickly to the prawns, imbuing them with intense, sweet-sharp, hot flavours.

Serves 6  Preparation Time 45 minutes
Ingredients
½ kg good prawns cleaned and de-veined
1 teaspoon lime / lemon juice
Salt to taste
2 onions chopped finely
1 teaspoon finely chopped garlic
1 teaspoon finely chopped ginger
2 tablespoons Oil
¼ teaspoon turmeric powder
1 teaspoon cumin powder
½ teaspoon garam masala powder / all spice powder 
2 teaspoon chillie powder
2 tablespoons tomato paste or 2 tomatoes chopped finely
2 tablespoons chopped coriander leaves

Marinate the prawns with the lime juice, turmeric and salt for 15 minutes. Fry the onion, garlic and ginger gently in the oil until golden brown. Now add the chillie powder, cumin powder, garam masala / all spice powder and fry for a few minutes. Add the prawns and sauté for around 3 minutes until the prawns start to turn pink. Now add the tomato paste / chopped tomatoes and cook on low heat for about 5 more minutes. Garnish with fresh coriander and serve with bread, rice or chapattis

Wednesday, August 8, 2012

BEEF PEPPER MINCE AND POTATOES

BEEF PEPPER MINCE AND POTATOES
Serves 6  Preparation Time 45 minutes
Ingredients
½ kg Beef Mince
2 big Onions chopped
½ teaspoon turmeric powder                
1 teaspoon chopped garlic
2 green chilies chopped finely
2 tablespoons oil
Salt to taste                                          
2 teaspoons pepper powder
2 Potatoes boiled and chopped into small pieces

Heat oil in a pan and fry the chopped garlic and onions till golden brown. Add the green chilies, turmeric powder, pepper powder and sauté for 3 minutes.  Add the mince and salt and mix well. Cook on low heat for about ½ an hour till the mince is cooked and all the water evaporates. Add the Potatoes and mix well. Simmer on low heat for 3 more minutes.  Serve hot with bread or chapattis.

Substitute Beef Mince with lamb / Mutton / Chicken /Pork Mince if desired.

Friday, August 3, 2012

POTATO CHOPS (PEPPER MINCE AND POTATO CUTLETS)

POTATO CHOPS  (PEPPER MINCE AND POTATO CUTLETS)
Serves 6  Preparation Time 1 hour
Ingredients
½ kg fine beef or lamb / mutton mince
1 medium sized onion chopped finely    
2 teaspoons pepper powder
Salt to taste
3 tablespoons oil
1 egg beaten
2 tablespoons breadcrumbs
3 large potatoes                 

Method:
Boil the potatoes, remove the skin and mash well.  Keep aside. 

In a pan add the mince, onions, pepper powder and salt with a little oil and simmer on low heat till the mince is dry.  Remove from heat and cool for some time.

Form the mashed potatoes into even sized balls. Make a depression in the center and fill with the pepper mince. Flatten each ball to form a round cutlet. Dip in the beaten egg then roll in the breadcrumbs.

Heat oil in a flat pan and shallow fry the cutlets on low heat till golden  brown on both sides.

Serve with Grilled Tomatoes or Ketchup

Monday, July 23, 2012

FRENCH TOAST - BOMBAY TOAST

FRENCH TOAST or BOMBAY TOAST is also known as 'Eggy Bread' in Anglo-Indian parlance. It is a very popular breakfast item in most Anglo-Indian Homes, and is often served as an accompaniment to the traditional breakfast of Fried Eggs, Bacon, Sausages etc. - A perfect breakfast for a lazy saturday!

Ingredients:

8 slices sandwich bread
2 eggs
2 tablespoons sugar
½ teaspoon vanilla essence
Butter or Ghee for frying
½ cup milk


Break the eggs in a bowl and beat well with the sugar. Add the vanilla essence and milk and mix well.

Heat a flat pan and add a tablespoon of butter or ghee and smear all over. When hot dip one slice of bread at a time in the egg and milk mixture and shallow fry each slice on both sides till golden brown. 2 or 3 slices can be fried at a time. Serve hot with either Condensed Milk, Jam, honey or powdered sugar.

To make a savoury french Toast, omit the sugar and vanilla essnce and instead add a dash of pepper and salt. Chopped green chillies, chopped onions and chopped corriander leaves (Cilantro leaves) could also be added for a spicy French - Bombay Toast.

Saturday, July 21, 2012

RAILWAY MUTTON / LAMB CURRY IN BBC GOOD FOOD MAGAZINE JULY 2012

My Recipe for RAILWAY MUTTON / LAMB CURRY was selected as the READER RECIPE OF THE MONTH in the July issue of the BBC GOOD FOOD MAGAZINE. As a result I won a special gift Hamper woth Rs 6000.00 from Debenhams. The Hamper contained a 5 piece Spoon Set and a Jamie Oliver Grater Gift set which has both the fine and coarse graters. Wanted to share this lovely bit of news with all the readers and followers of ALL MY BLOGS as well as my Page PRESERVING ANGLO-INDIAN CUISINE on FACE BOOK . Thanks for all your love and support. God bless you all. Bridget

RAILWAY LAMB / MUTTON CURRY
Serves 6     Preparation Time 45 minutes
Ingredients
½ kg mutton or lamb cut into medium size pieces     
6 peppercorns
2 big onions sliced                
2 pieces cinnamon
2 cloves
2 cardamoms
8 to 10 curry leaves
4 red chilies broken into bits
1teaspoon chillie powder
1teaspoon ginger garlic paste
Salt to taste         
2 tablespoons oil
2 tablespoons vinegar or ½ cup of tamarind juice

Wash the meat and mix it with the ginger garlic paste, salt and the chilly powder. Heat oil in a pan and fry the onions, curry leaves, red chillies and spices till golden brown.  Add the meat and mix well.  Fry for a few minutes. Add the vinegar / Tamarind juice and sufficient water and cook on medium heat till the meat is done. Keep frying till the gravy is thick and dark brown.
Note: Substitute beef for lamb / mutton if desired.
                                                       --------------------

Sunday, July 15, 2012

OKRA / LADY FINGERS PEPPER FRY

LADY FINGERS / OKRA PEPPER FRY
 (Also known in Anglo-Indian Parlance as BANDY COY FRY - a spin off of the Hindi word 'Bhendi' )
Serves 6    Preparation Time 45 minutes
Ingredients
½ kg okra / lady fingers,
2 onions chopped finely,
a few curry leaves,           
1 teaspoon ginger and garlic paste,
2 teaspoons black pepper powder,
½ teaspoon turmeric powder,
2 tablespoons oil, salt to taste

Cut the okra / ladyfingers on a slant into medium size pieces. Deep fry in hot oil for a few minutes. The okra should be cooked but still crunchy

 Heat oil in a pan and add the curry leaves and onions and fry till golden brown. Add the black pepper powder, salt, turmeric powder, and ginger garlic paste and sauté for a few minutes. Now add the mushrooms and mix well. Cook on low heat for a few minutes till the mushrooms are cooked. Garnish with browned onions.

Tuesday, June 5, 2012

LAMB /MUTTON HUSSAINY CURRY ALSO KNOWN AS THE STICK CURRY

Hussainy Curry is also known as the Stick curry or Kebab Curry. This particular dish was quite popular in the olden days with the Anglo-Indian families living in Calcutta and Eastern India.


LAMB / MUTTON HUSSAINY CURRY ALSO KNOWN AS THE STICK CURRY
Serves 6           Preparation Time 1 hour

Ingredients
1 kg lamb or mutton cut into small cubes
1 cup curds / yogurt
1 teaspoon ginger and garlic paste
1 teaspoon turmeric powder
2 teaspoons chillie powder
1 teaspoon garam masala powder or all spice powder
2 onions sliced
2 tablespoons tomato paste or tomato puree
2 tablespoons chopped corriander leaves
10 or 12 thick broom sticks / bamboo sticks or thin skewers 4” in length
3 tablespoons oil
Salt to taste

Marinate the meat with a little turmeric powder, salt and a little curds / yogurt for one hour.
Heat oil in a suitable vessel and sauté the onions for a few minutes. Add the ginger and garlic paste and fry for a few minutes. Add the chillie powder, turmeric powder, garam masala powder / all spice powder, chopped corriander leaves, tomato paste / tomato puree, remaining curds and salt and stir fry for a few minutes. Add 1 cup of water and bring to boil. Meanwhile pass the broom sticks / bamboo sticks / skewers through the marinated meat. About 5 pieces should fit on each stick. Place the sticks of meat in the curry that is boiling. Close the vessel and simmer on low heat till the meat is cooked. Serve without removing the sticks with white steamed rice and a corriander or mint chutney.

This dish got its name because it was an inovation of a Muslim Cook named Hussain and was named after him

Sunday, May 27, 2012

SPICY PRAWN / LOBSTER CURRY

Serves 6   Preparation Time 1 hour



















Ingredients
500 grams cleaned and de-veined prawns
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
2 green chillies slit lengthwise
1 teaspoon ginger and garlic paste
3 tomatoes chopped
2 onions sliced finely
1 teaspoon spice powder or garam masala powder
2 teaspoon chillie powder
2 tablespoons coconut paste / coconut milk
3 tablespoons oil
Salt to taste
Heat oil in a suitable pan and add the cumin seeds. When they begin to splutter add the onions and fry till golden brown. Add the prawns and stir fry for a few minutes till they change colour. Now add all the other ingredients and a little water and stir well. Simmer on low heat till the prawns are cooked and the gravy is thick. Serve with rice, chapattis or bread.

Friday, May 18, 2012

FISH AND GREEN MANGO CURRY

Serves 6           Preparation Time 45 minutes
Ingredients
½ Kg King Fish / Seer Fish slices / Spanish Blue Mackerel
1 teaspoon ginger garlic paste
1 teaspoon coriander powder
1 teaspoon cumin powder
2 teaspoons chillie powder                                       
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
Salt to taste                                                          
3 tablespoons oil
2 green mangoes peeled and cut into medium size pieces                  
2 onions sliced finely
 ½ cup coconut paste
2 green chilies
3 tablespoons coriander leaves to garnish
                                             
Cook the green mango pieces with the green chillies and a pinch of turmeric in a little water till soft.
Heat oil in a pan and fry the onions till golden brown. Add the ginger garlic paste and sauté for a few minutes. Add the turmeric powder, chillie powder, cumin powder, coriander powder, coconut paste and salt and mix well. Keep frying on low heat till the oil separates from the mixture. Add the fish and the cooked mango pieces and sufficient water and cook for 5 to 6 minutes till the fish is done.   Garnish with the chopped coriander leaves. Serve hot with rice.

Thursday, May 17, 2012

ANGLO-INDIAN COOKING DEMONSTRATION AT THE TAJ WEST END BANGALORE

Here is another picture of Anglo-Indian Dishes demonstrated and prepared by me at the Food trials Lunch at the Taj West End Bangalore on 10th and 17th May 2012.
The dishes in the picture are pepper lamb chops, Mince Ball curry, Tangy fish Curry, Prawn fry, Beans foogath, Cabbage Foogath, lady fingers Pepper Fry, Fish Fingers, vegetable Croquettes, Rosemary flavoured potatoes, Tangy Bringal (Aubergine), Beef in Green Masala, Chicken and Potatoes, Liver and Onion Fry, Butter Rice, Cauliflower and Capsicum foogath, Coconut Rice garnished with browned onions, etc, etc. Seen also in the picture is me along with Executive Chef Sandip Narang and other Executives of the Taj West End enjoying the spread
 

Thursday, May 10, 2012

COLONIAL ANGLO-INDIAN DISHES SHOW CASED BY ME AT THE TAJ WEST END, BANGALORE

The Taj West End Bangalore is celebrating 125 years of the West End. I was invited by them to be part of the 125 years celebrations by demonstrating the old Colonial Anglo-Indian Dishes in their MYNT Kitchen from the 27th April to the 8th May.
The West End already has a Colonial Anglo-Indian Menu for Brunch on Week ends at the MYNT Coffee Shop. They are going to incorporate some of the dishes shown by me in the new Menu.
These are the dishes demonstrated by me. Along with me is Chef Abijith and Chef Susai. I had a lovely time demonstrating and showing off my Culinary Skills!!!
 

Friday, April 13, 2012

Authentic Anglo-Indian Recipes - ALMORTH (MIXED MEAT AND VEGETABLE STEW)

Authentic Anglo-Indian Recipes   ALMORTH (MIXED MEAT AND VEGETABLE STEW)

ANGLO-INDIAN PISH-PASH

Pish-Pash is a coloquial Anglo-Indian Name for rice that has been over cooked or pish-pashy. Pish-Pash is a simple rice and lentils (dhal) dish cooked together till both the rice and dhal are overcooked and soft. A few peices of chicken or a chicken soup cube could also be added while cooking to give the dish a better flavour. This dish could also given to invalids as it is found to be easily digestible.


ANGLO-INDIAN PISH-PASH (A SIMPLE RICE AND LENTILS MIX UP)
Serves 6   Preparation time  1 hour
Ingredients
1 cup raw rice - wash and keep aside
¼ cup Masur Dhal or Moong  Dhal - wash and keep aside
3 cardamons
3 cloves
2 small sticks of cinnamon
5 or 6 pepper corns 
2 teaspoons ginger garlic paste
1 teaspoon chillie powder
Salt to taste
3 tablespoons oil or ghee
3 tablespoons chopped coriander leaves
2 tablespoons chopped mint leaves

Heat oil in a vessel and fry the whole spices for 2 minutes. Add the ginger garlic paste and chillie powder and sauté for a few minutes. Add the washed raw rice and dhal and stir-fry for a few minutes. Now add the coriander leaves, mint, salt and 3 cups of water and cook till the rice and dhal are soft and ‘pishy-pashy’. Serve with omelet and pickle