ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPE BOOKS by Bridget White

ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPE BOOKS by Bridget White
ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPE BOOKS by Bridget White

No Copy and Paste from this Site

All the recipes and Photographs on this Site are old Family Recipes and tried and tested by the Author. Please feel free to try out these old recipes, and relish them, but desist from copying and using on other sites without the prior permission of Bridget White-Kumar. Any infringement would amount to Plagarism and infringement of Copy Rightpunishable by Law

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

COCONUT SWEETS (BARFI)

2 cups scraped coconut
2 ½ cups sugar
1 cup milk
1 teaspoon butter or ghee
½ teaspoon vanilla essence
½ teaspoon food colouring (pink or green)
Take a thick -bottomed vessel and heat the sugar and ¼ cup water on high heat. When the sugar melts, add the cocoanut, vanilla essence, ghee or butter and the milk. Cook on medium or low heat till the mixture thickens and leaves the sides of the vessel. Drop a teaspoon of the mixture in a cup of water and if it forms a ball when rolled between the fingers, the right consistency is reached. Grease a flat plate well and pour the mixture on to it. Cool and cut into shapes.

Sunday, December 19, 2010

HOME MADE TOMATO JAM

1 kg firm just ripe tomatoes


1 kg sugar

2 tablespoons lime juice

1 teaspoon lemon or orange peel

3 sticks cinnamon

4 cloves



Blanch the tomatoes in hot water and remove the skins. Cut into quarters and simmer together with the sugar, cinnamon, cloves, lime juice and lemon / orange peel till the mixture thickens. Cool and store

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

RICH PLUM CAKE

300 grams Plain Flour / Maida
300 grams brown Sugar
100 grams powdered white sugar
3 Eggs beaten
2 teaspoons vanilla essence
300 grams butter
1 teaspoon nutmeg powder
1 teaspoon cinnamon powder
3 tablespoons date syrup
300 grams dried fruit
50 grams orange /lemon peel
250 ml Rum or Brandy
Soak the dried fruit and orange / lemon peel in Rum or Brandy for about 1month.
Just before using, strain and mix in 3 tablespoons of flour to it. Keep aside.Cream the butter, sugar and brown sugar well. Add the beaten eggs, date syrup and vanilla essence and mix well. Add the orange / lemon peel and dried fruits, nutmeg powder and cinnamon powder and mix well Slowly add the flour and fold in well. If the mixture is too thick add a little milk. Pour into a greased and papered baking tin or dish and bake in a slow oven for about 40 to 45 minutes. Remove from the oven when done and set aside to cool. (Ice this cake only when completely cold)

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

COCONUT SWEETS

COCONUT SWEETS
2 cups scraped coconut
2 ½ cups sugar
1 cup milk
1 teaspoon butter or ghee
½ teaspoon vanilla essence
½ teaspoon food colouring (pink or green)

Take a thick -bottomed vessel and heat the sugar and ¼ cup water on high heat. When the sugar melts, add the cocoanut, vanilla essence, ghee or butter and the milk. Cook on medium or low heat till the mixture thickens and leaves the sides of the vessel. Drop a teaspoon of the mixture in a cup of water and if it forms a ball when rolled between the fingers, the right consistency is reached. Grease a flat plate well and pour the mixture on to it. Cool and cut into shapes.

Sunday, November 21, 2010

CHRISTMAS GOODIES

SPECIAL STEAMED CHRISTMAS PLUM PUDDING
Serves 6 Preparation time 1 hour
Ingredients

200 grams fresh bread crumbs
200 grams butter
2 teaspoons instant coffee (Nescafe or Bru)
2 teaspoons golden or date syrup
½ teaspoon baking powder
2 eggs beaten well
¼ cup rum
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon and cloves
¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
100 grams raisins
100 grams chopped sultanas
100 grams mixed peel
½ teaspoon salt
100 grams sugar

Cream the butter and sugar together then add the eggs and mix well. Gradually add all the other ingredients and mix well. Grease a Pudding Mould or any suitable bowl with butter. Pour the pudding mixture into it then steam the pudding for about 1 hour on low heat till it is firm to touch Note: This pudding can be made in advance and refrigerated till required. Steam for 10 minute or microwave for 3 minutes before serving. For a more exotic taste, when still warm make a few small holes all over the pudding and pour about 6 tablespoons of rum over it.


CHRISTMAS FRUIT MINCE PIES
Serves 6 Preparation time 1 hour
Ingredients

200 grams flour / maida
2 eggs beaten
150 grams powdered sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon powder
250 grams chopped dry fruits soaked in a little rum before hand
150 grams butter
½ teaspoon baking powder

Sieve the flour with the baking powder. Cream butter and sugar till creamy and fluffy. Add the eggs then mix with the flour. Knead to a smooth batter. Roll out the dough and cut out circles. Line a few pie shells with this. Fill each one with the marinated dry fruit and seal with another layer of the dough. Prick on top with a toothpick. Bake the pies in a moderate oven for about 20 minutes.

Thursday, November 4, 2010

BAKED FISH FILLETS WITH CHEESE (Fish Mornay)

6 medium sized pieces of any boneless fish
2 teaspoons ground black pepper
3 teaspoons butter
½ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon chopped mint
4 spring onions chopped finely
2 tablespoons grated cheese
3 tablespoons flour
1 cup milk

Wash the fish and marinate it with the salt and pepper and mint for about 10 minutes.
Meanwhile make the sauce. Warm the milk with a little water in a pan. Mix in the flour and stir to get a smooth paste. Add the butter, ½ teaspoon ground pepper / pepper powder and salt and mix well. Cook for 3 or 4 more minutes on low heat till the mixture thickens, then turn off the heat.

Lay the marinated fish flat in a shallow greased baking dish. Pour the sauce over the fish and shake the dish so that the sauce covers the fish well. Sprinkle the chopped spring onions and the grated cheese over the top. Cover the dish with aluminum foil and bake in a moderate oven (3550) for about 25 to 30 minutes.

Serve hot with bread or dinner rolls.

Monday, November 1, 2010

ANGLO-INDIAN PORK VINDALOO

 
1 kg pork with lard cut into medium pieces       
3 big onions slices finely
3 big tomatoes pureed                        
1 tablespoon cumin powder
½ teaspoon turmeric powder               
1 teaspoon mustard powder
2 teaspoons chillie powder 
1 teaspoon pepper powder
2 tablespoons garlic paste       
3 tablespoons vinegar
2 tablespoons oil                                                            
Salt to taste

Marinate the pork with the salt, vinegar, chillie powder, cumin powder pepper powder, mustard powder, turmeric powder and garlic paste for about one hour.
Heat oil in a suitable pan and fry the onions till golden brown.  Add the marinated pork and fry for a little while. Add the tomato puree and keep frying for some more time. Now add sufficient water and cook on low heat till the meat is well cooked. Serve hot with rice or bread. Enjoy this lovely delicious Anglo-Indian Dish with coconut Rice or steamed white rice. Tastes great with chappattis, Hoppers, Dosas too

Saturday, October 23, 2010

HONEY DOUGH BALLS

1 cup plain flour
1 cup warm water
1/4 teaspoon dry yeast
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon sugar
10 tablespoons honey
4 tablespoons water
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon powder
Oil for deep frying

Dissolve the yeast in the cup of warm water. Mix the salt and flour in another bowl and add the dissolved yeast. Mix well to form a thick batter. Cover and let it rest for an hour.
Heat the oil in a suitable deep pan. Take scoops of the batter and drop them into the hot oil and fry till they puff up and turn brown. Drain on paper towels.
When slightly cold pour the honey over the fried balls and sprinkle sugar and cinnamon over them.

Friday, October 15, 2010

Passing on the legacy of Anglo-Indian cuisine

Passing on the legacy of Anglo-Indian cuisine
By Theresa Varghese
, Bangalore

People like Koramangala-based Bridget White-Kumar prove that you do not have to be an academician or historian to bring the past alive. Instead of simply retiring, she has become a food ambassador.
The recently released Julie and Julia enthralled cinema lovers and foodies equally. The film, in part, shows the determination of an otherwise laidback Julia Child’s (played by Meryl Streep) endeavours to become a Cordon Bleu cook, her resolve to teach American women the art of French cuisine and the difficulties in getting her first recipe book published.
Author of six cookbooks and a blog on Anglo Indian cuisine, Bridget White-Kumar is Karnataka’s very own food ambassador. For Bridget White-Kumar this story could be termed familiar territory. Author of six cookbooks and a blog on Anglo Indian cuisine, she is Karnataka’s very own food ambassador. And, like Julia, the road to getting published was a rocky one for Bridget.

A former bank employee, Bridget’s professional life took a 180 degree turn when, after opting for voluntary retirement, she began to document Anglo Indian cuisine. Always interested in food, it was only when her daughter left for higher education to a foreign country that Bridget realised the value of the knowledge she held.
“I wrote out some recipes for my daughter,” recalls Bridget. “This became so popular with her friends that we dubbed it the black book. As she kept calling me to clear doubts, I realised that many of these recipes would probably die out if they were not recorded.” It provided the impetus for Bridget’s first book – The Best of Anglo Indian Cuisine – a Legacy, which came out in 2004.

With publisher after publisher rejecting her manuscript, by the time a publishing house finally agreed to the book, Bridget was weary of the entire procedure. So she decided to bring it out herself. Despite the high expense that self publishing entails, Bridget has not regretted the decision.

“The Internet has been a huge blessing,” she says with a smile. Thanks to technology and the blog, Bridget has been able to market her books so well that she has recovered all costs incurred. Considering that she did not know how to even work a computer before she embarked on her cookbooks, this is no mean feat. There have been no book launches or media blitzes either, but word of mouth did the rounds and the resultant press write-ups propelled Bridget into the limelight. Publishers also took note. Bridget’s seventh book, currently with a major publishing house, will soon be out. And her eighth – a nostalgic look at life in Kolar Gold Fields (KGF), has been published by Author House UK.

The Best of Anglo Indian Cuisine - Bridget White-Kumar.

Bridget, who grew up in the close knit mining community of KGF where a large percentage of the population were Anglo Indians, believes that Anglo Indian cuisine is the first instance of fusion food in India. “It is a confluence of various cultures, not just Indian and British,” she says. “Even within Anglo Indian communities in different parts of India, the ingredients for the same dish can vary. In Cochin the use of coconut will be more, while in Calcutta the oil used would be mustard. But whichever the region, the use of spices remains constant. The judicious use of spices is the defining trait of our food. Not spicy and not bland,” she adds.

Bridget’s favourite meal is yellow coconut rice, mince ball curry and pepper chicken. It is a reminder of her childhood. And of a past that she remembers with clarity. With four generations of Whites in the mining sector and a family home in Robertsonpet in KGF, Christmases especially were a great time for merriment and feasting.

To read Bridget-White Kumar’s blog, click here. For copies of her books, contact her on 9845571254 or at bidkumar[at]gmail[dot]com or bridgetkumar[at]yahoo[dot]com
“My father was a mining engineer and we lived in huge rambling quarters in KGF. There were four mines and each mine would have their Christmas function; with a tree, games for children, Santa distributing goodies, a funfair with food stalls where coconut puffs and marshmallows were favourites and the Christmas dance which began at 9 in the night and wound up by 5 in the morning! The dance was a big event; people would come from Chennai and Bangalore to hear the groups playing,” she says.

It is recollections like these that you will find in her yet to be published book. People like Bridget White-Kumar prove that you do not have to be an academician or historian to bring the past alive. She could have led an ordinary retired life but, with her perseverance in documenting the food of a dwindling community and her resolve to pen memories of a world that has disappeared, she has chosen to tread a different path.

Plum cake
Serves 6
Preparation time 1 hour

Ingredients
300 grams flour or maida
250 grams butter
250 grams powdered sugar
3 eggs (whites beaten well separately)
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoon chopped orange or lemon peel
100 grams black currant chopped
2 tablespoon date syrup (for colour)
2 cloves and two small pieces of chinnamon powdered
1 table spoon vanilla essence

Shift the flour, baking powder and salt together. Dust the orange/ lemon peel and chopped black currants with a little flour. Cream the butter and sugar well. Add the egg yolks, date syrup, cinnamon and clove powder and vanilla essence and mix well. Add the orange/ lemon peel and black currants. Slowly add the egg whites and flour and fold it well. If the mixture is too thick add a little milk. Pour into a greased and papered baking tin or dish and bake in a sow oven for about 40 to 45 minutes. Remove from the oven when done and set aside to cool.

(Taken from The Anglo-Indian Festive Hamper, one of the books Bridget White authored.)

Theresa Varghese
23 Dec 2009
Independent writer and ardent baker who loves all things to do with food

Friday, October 1, 2010

Chicken Curry in a Hurry

Serves 6 Preparation Time 30 minutes
Ingredients

1 kg chicken jointed and cut into medium size pieces
A small bunch of coriander leaves washed and chopped
2 large onions chopped
2 tomatoes chopped
½ teaspoon tumeric powder
2 or 3 teaspoons chilly powder
2 cloves, 2 pieces of cinnamon, 2 cardamoms, 1 bay leaf
1 teaspoon ginger paste
1 teaspoon garlic paste
3 tablespoons oil
Salt to taste
1teaspoon cumin powder

Heat oil in a pan and add the onions, Fry till golden brown. Add the cloves, cinnamon, cardamom, bay leaf, tomato, ginger paste and garlic paste and sauté for a few minutes. Now add the chicken, salt, chilly powder, tumeric powder and cumin powder and fry for some time till the oil separates from the masala. Add sufficient water and cook till the chicken is done and the gravy is thick

Tuesday, August 3, 2010

World Anglo-Indian Day Celebrations at Raj Bhavan, Bangalore on 2/8/10

 
Posted by Picasa
Presenting a set of my Anglo-Indian Cookery Books to Mrs Hans Raj Bhardwaj,wife of his Excellency the Governnor of Karnataka during the World Anglo-Indian Day celebrations on 2nd August 2010 at the Raj Bhavan in Bangalore

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

ANGLO-INDIAN MASALA CHOPS (GRILL CHOPS)

½ kg good chops either mutton, beef or veal
2 teaspoons ginger garlic paste
2 tablespoons vinegar
2 large onions sliced fine
2 or 3 green chilies sliced lengthwise
3 tablespoons oil
2 teaspoons chillie powder
1 teaspoon pepper powder
Salt to taste
1 teaspoon cumin powder
1 teaspoon coriander powder

.Wash the chops and marinate them with the ginger and garlic paste, pepper powder, chillie powder, vinegar, cumin powder, coriander powder and salt for about 30 minutes. Heat oil in a large pan and sauté the onions and green chilies for a few minutes. Add the marinated chops and mix well. Simmer for a few minutes. Add sufficient water and cook till the chops are done and the gravy dries up. Keep frying on low heat till the chops turn a nice brown colour. Garnish with onion rings.

Saturday, July 10, 2010

Railway Lamb / Mutton Curry

Railway Lamb / Mutton Curry is a direct throw back to the days of the British Raj, when traveling by train was considered aristocratic. This very popular and slightly spicy dish was served in Railway Refreshment Rooms and on long distance trains, with Bread or Dinner Rolls. The curry was not too spicy keeping in mind the delicate palates of the British. It was also popular with the Railway staff who had to be on duty for long periods at a stretch. The vinegar or Tamarind juice used in its preparation would ensure that the curry would last for quite a few days and was an ideal accompaniment with rice as well. The recipe for this dish is sure to bring back some happy memories.

RAILWAY LAMB CURRY

Serves 6 Preparation Time 45 minutes

½ kg mutton or lamb cut into medium size pieces
6 peppercorns
2 big onions sliced
2 pieces cinnamon
2 cloves
2 cardamoms
8 to 10 curry leaves
4 red chilies broken into bits
1teaspoon chilly powder
1teaspoon ginger garlic paste
Salt to taste
2 tablespoons oil
2 tablespoons vinegar or ½ cup of tamarind juice

Wash the meat and mix it with the ginger garlic paste, salt and the chilly powder. Heat oil in a pan and fry the onions, curry leaves, red chillies and spices till golden brown. Add the meat and mix well. Fry for a few minutes. Add the vinegar / Tamarind juice and sufficient water and cook on medium heat till the meat is done. Keep frying till the gravy is thick and dark brown.

Thursday, July 8, 2010

FRIED SAVOURY MINCE PAN ROLLS OR PANTERASS

SAVOURY MINCE PAN ROLLS / PANTERASS
October 6, 2009 by bridgetkumar
Ingredients for the Pan Rolls
2 cups flour
3 eggs beaten
1 cup milk
2 tablespoons melted butter
A pinch salt

Ingredients for the Mince
500 grams topside mince
1 onion chopped finely
1 teaspoon chopped garlic
1 teaspoon chopped ginger
2 medium size potatoes peeled and cut into 2cm cubes
Salt to taste
2 teaspoons chillie powder
1 teaspoon garam masala powder or all spice powder
1 teaspoon cumin powder
1 teaspoon coriander powder
1 egg lightly beaten
Oil for deep frying
1 cup dry bread crumbs

On low heat, cook the mince along with the chopped onion, garlic, giner, potatoes, chillie powder, garam masala / all spice powder, cumin powder, coriander powder and salt with half cup of water till the potatoes are soft and the mince is cooked. Cool and keep aside.

Mix the flour, 3 eggs, milk, butter and salt with a little water to make a think batter. Make thin pancakes / crepes on a flat pan cooking them on one side only.

Place each pan cake / crepe on a plate, add a tablespoon of mince mix on one end and roll up tucking in the sides as you would a spring roll. Follow the same procedure till all the mince and pancakes / crepes are exhausted.

Heat oil in a pan. Dip each pan roll in beaten egg then roll in bread crumbs. Shallow fry until golden and drain on a kitchen towel.

Saturday, May 8, 2010

SWEET COCONUT PUFFS

For the Dough: 250 grams refined flour or maida, 50 grams butter, ½ teaspoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon salt, ½ kg oil for frying.

For the Filling: 3 cups grated coconut and 3 tablespoons sugar mixed together

Sift the flour with the salt and baking powder. Mix in the butter and knead to a fairly stiff dough with very little water. Keep aside for 1 hour.

Take the dough on a floured board and roll out into a thin sheet. Cut squares of about 2 to 3 inches per side. Put a tablespoon of the sweetened coconut on half of the square. Fold the other half over in such a way to form a triangle. Seal the edges by dampening with a little water. Heat the oil in a deep pan till smoky. Slowly drop in as many puffs as the pan can hold and fry till brown on both sides. Remove from the pan and drain.

Note: These puffs can last for a fortnight if dry cocoanut or copra is used instead of fresh coconut.

Monday, May 3, 2010

BREAD PUDDING

8 slices of bread
2 cups milk
50 grams butter
3 tablespoons sugar
½ teaspoon vanilla essence
½ cup chopped cashew nuts or walnuts
2 eggs beaten well.

Remove the crusts from the bread slices and break into small pieces. Take a baking dish and grease it. Spread the pieces of bread in it. Mix the milk, beaten eggs, sugar, vanilla essence and butter together and pour this mixture over the pieces of bread soaking them completely. Sprinkle the nuts on the top. Bake in a hot oven for 20 to 30 minutes.
Note: This pudding can also be steamed for 30 minutes instead of baking if desired

Tuesday, April 13, 2010

SPICY ANGLO-INDIAN PORK ROAST AND MUSTARD SAUCE

2kg pork (1 whole piece) from the shoulder portion
2 teaspoons pepper powder
4 dried red chillies broken into bits
3 pieces of cinnamon about ½ inch each
1 teaspoon chilly powder
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
2 or 3 onions sliced 1 tablespoon vinegar
1 tablespoon oil
Salt to taste
Wash the pork and rub it well all over with the salt, pepper, chilly powder and turmeric powder. Spread the sliced onions evenly in a fairly large greased baking dish. Lay the chunk of pork on the layer of onions. Sprinkle the broken red chillies and cinnamon over it. Drizzle the oil all over the meat. Shake the dish so that it spreads evenly. Cook in a moderate oven (355 0 ) for about one and a half hours till the meat is soft and brown. (Turn the meat over every half hour so that it browns all over evenly).
Cut the pork into slices and arrange on a platter. Serve with mash potato, steamed vegetables, dinner rolls and Anglo-indian Mustard Sauce.
The Pork Roast could be prepared using a Pressure cooker instead of baking in an oven.

ANGLO-INDIAN MUSTARD SAUCE. 
This sauce can be used as a spread for sandwiches by mixing it with shredded meat, vegetables, mayonnaise etc. It can also be eaten as a side relish with any type of Roasted Meat, Chicken Turkey, Duck etc.
This sauce was an integral sauce on every Anglo-Indian table during the Christmas Season

50 grams ordinary black or brown mustard
10 grams white mustard
1 teaspoon chillie powder
2 teaspoons garlic paste
2 tablespoons sugar
Salt to taste
A small piece of Drumstick Bark
1 cup white vinegar
Grind all the above to a smooth paste. Add a little more vinegar to make the paste into a sauce like consistency. Refrigerate and use when required.
Note: In case the drumstick bark is not available substitute with a stick of cinnamon.

Tuesday, March 30, 2010

PORK / LAMB TROTTERS IN GRAVY

8-Trotters (mutton or pork) preferably the front ones
1teaspoon ginger paste
1 teaspoon garlic paste
2-teaspoons spice powder
2-large tomatoes chopped
3-teaspoons chillie powder
2-large onions chopped
1-teaspoon coriander powder
3-tablespoons oil
Salt to taste
2 tablespoons coriander leaves chopped.

Heat oil in a pressure cooker and lightly sauté the onions. Add the trotters, spice powder, chillie powder, tomato, coriander powder and salt and mix well. Add sufficient water and pressure cook first on high heat then on low heat for half an hour till the trotters are well cooked. Garnish with chopped coriander leaves. Serve hot with rice or bread or even dosas or hoppers.

Thursday, March 18, 2010

ANGLO-INDIAN OX TONGUE ROAST

Serves 6
Preparation Time 45 minutes
1Large Ox tongue
1 big onion sliced
4 red chilies broken into bits
1 teaspoon whole pepper corns
2 cloves
2 pieces of cinnamon
2 tablespoons oil
Salt to taste

Wash the tongue well and then pressure cook it with 2 cups of water and a little salt till tender letting some soup remain. Open the pressure cooker and remove the boiled tongue. Let it cool for some time. When it is a little cold remove the white skin from the tongue and put it back into the open cooker and add the oil, onion, red chilies pepper corns, cloves and cinnamon and a little more salt. Mix well. Simmer on low heat till all the soup dries up and the tongue is nicely brown all over .Cut into slices and arrange on a plate along with the residue. Serve hot or cold with mash potatoes and bread. You can make very delicious sandwiches with tongue roast as filling.

Friday, March 5, 2010

JELEBI CARAMEL CUSTARD

6 Jelebis (available in any Indian Sweet stall)
3 eggs beaten
½ tsp vanilla essence
½ litre milk
6 tablespoons sugar
A pinch of salt
4 tablespoons flour
1 teaspoon butter

Take a flat bottomed baking dish and grease it well with butter. Boil the milk and keep aside. Pre heat the oven till slightly warm. When the milk is slightly cold add the eggs, vanilla essence, flour and sugar and beat well till there are no lumps. Pour a thin layer of this mixture into the baking dish and let it set in the warm oven till it forms a base. Take out the dish and arrange the Jelebis in it. Pour the rest of the mixture over the Jelebis and bake for about 15 to 20 minutes till the custard sets and is golden brown on top. The custard should be moist and not dry. Garnish with sliced cashewnuts or pistachios.

Sunday, February 14, 2010

SIMPLE TOMATO SAMBAL

4 large tomatoes chopped
2 green chilies chopped
2 large onions sliced finely
Salt to taste
1teaspoon chillie powder
Juice of 1 lime
2 tablespoons oil
Heat the oil in a pan and fry the onions till golden brown. Add the chopped tomatoes, chilies, salt, chillie powder and lime juice. Simmer on low heat till the tomatoes are cooked to a pulp and all the water dries up. Serve with rice, chapattis, Dosa or Idlis

Friday, February 5, 2010

Corned Beef

2 Kgs tender beef from the “Round” Portion
1 kg Table salt or powdered salt
50 grams Saltpeter or Lime salt powdered
1 tablespoon moist brown sugar
Juice of 8 limes
2 teaspoons vinegar

Wash and dry the meat well. Puncture holes all over it. Mix the salt, saltpeter and brown sugar together. Divide this mixture into 4 parts. Rub the Beef all over with one portion of the salt mixture and juice of 2 limes. Turn the beef around so that the salt solution seeps into it well. Repeat this after every 2 hours rubbing it well several times during the day. Next morning remove from the old dish and place it on another dry dish, and rub into it the second portion of the prepared salt. Let it stand for an hour or so, then pour over it the remainder of the 2nd portion of the salt solution. Repeat the rubbing two or three times during the day, turning the beef continually. On the 3rd and 4th day repeat the procedure of placing in a fresh dish and rubbing the beef well with the 3rd and 4th portions of the prepared salt solutions and lime juice. On the 5th day boil or pressure cook the meat with all the residue of the salt solution for at least 1 hour on low heat. Cool and store. Use for sandwiches etc when required.

Tuesday, February 2, 2010

Fish in Mustard Gravy

1 kg good fish such as Hilsa or Trout
3 tablespoons oil
2 tablespoons mustard powder
1 teaspoon turmeric powder
8 to 10 green chillies
Salt to taste

Make a paste of the mustard with about 6 tablespoons of water. Heat oil in a non-stick pan and fry the mustard paste and turmeric powder for about 5 minutes on low heat. Add 3 cups of warm water and mix well. Bring to boil. Add the fish, green chillies and salt and cook on medium heat till the fish is cooked and the gravy thickens a bit.

Thursday, January 14, 2010

STUFFED FLAT BREAD / DHAL PURI

2 cups channa dal (Bengal gram)
½ tsp Turmeric powder
½ teaspoon cumin powder
Salt to taste
4 cups flour
Ghee or Oil for deep frying
Wash dal and boil with turmeric and salt till its soft (but not mushy) in just enough water (2 cups) so that water gets absorbed when its done. Kneed flour with water to a stiff dough and keep aside. Strain and grind dal to a fine paste, add cumin powder. Adjust salt to taste. Divide the dal paste into equal portions for puris. Take a ball of dough, make a depression and add the dal paste. Close and then roll out to a thin puri or flat bread. Heat oil in a deep pan till smoky. Fry the stuffed dhal puris one at a time on a high flame for a few minutes till done. Serve with chutney